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Why Your Business Should Bring Beacons And Apple TV Together

Proximity platform Kontakt.io is enabling 'beacon broadcasts' because some messages are too big for mobile screens alone.

Why Your Business Should Bring Beacons And Apple TV Together

Instead of focusing beacon-based notifications on individual consumers’ smartphones, Konkakt.io is suggesting that businesses add a second screen to their proximity marketing mix: an Apple TV.

Talking about the promise of beacon technology is always accompanied by the friction associated with getting consumers to opt-in to a place’s branded app. As if that weren’t enough, people then have to turn on their smartphone’s Bluetooth receiver. And despite the rise of “phablets” being carried around, even the biggest smartphone screens can seem truncated and limited when trying to show consumers splashy graphics.

Proximity platform Kontakt.io has an answer to retailers who are still reluctant about using beacons in their stores: simply target messages to large video screens that are strategically placed around a store.

The Apple TV console could be used to extend in-store signals between individuals' iPhones and larger video monitors as they approach.
The Apple TV console could be used to extend in-store signals between individuals’ iPhones and larger video monitors as they approach.

In a blog post, the Poland-based company suggests some ideas for using beacons to create dynamic messages in stores. One possible idea Kontakt.io has involves posting display ads on nearby AppleTV screens as someone with an iPhone — and, optimally, with their Bluetooth turned on — approaches. Ads can be tied to a consumer’s preferences within a store’s branded app.

For example, a McDonald’s kiosk connected to Apple TV and in-store beacons could bring up previous orders that a person in line has made on their their iPhone.

McDonald's video terminals could be connected to beacons and back to consumers' iPhones for faster ordering.
McDonald’s video terminals could be connected to beacons and back to consumers’ iPhones for faster ordering.

“We’re taking one of the major pain points out of learning how to use beacons,” said Trevor Longino, head of Product at Kontakt.io, in a statement. “Now anyone who has an Apple TV (30 million units sold to date) or a Macbook (133 million units sold to date) can get started scanning beacons, creating virtual beacons, and developing their own tools for proximity interactions.”

About The Author
David Kaplan David Kaplan @davidakaplan

A New York City-based journalist for over 20 years, David Kaplan is managing editor of GeoMarketing.com. A former editor and reporter at AdExchanger, paidContent, Adweek and MediaPost.