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Who Should Walmart And Amazon Acquire Next?

Foursquare CEO Jeff Glueck has come up with a long list based on the location-value of brands like Warby Parker, Home Depot, Nordstrom, Ulta Beauty, and others,

As Walmart and Amazon rush to build up their respective online/offline commerce strategies, it’s safe to say that key acquisitions will play a part in efforts to keep pace, if not out-pace, the other as “the ultimate retailer” in consumers’ minds.

For example,  within the last three months, Amazon made its $13.7 billion bid to acquire Whole Foods, while Walmart bought e-commerce platforms Jet and Bonobos, speculation swirled around these two retail behemoths each striving to become the ultimate shopping destination—both on and offline.

Foursquare has come up with a list of some obvious acquisition targets that would fit Walmart’s and Amazon’s intersecting and unique needs in their drive towards retail hegemony.

But by basing its selected brand targets based on its foot-traffic data covering 2.5 million Americans, Foursquare CEO Jeff Glueck makes the case for where the best complements exist for each company in a blog post.

“Amazon and Walmart would both be wise to consider Nordstrom and Warby Parker,” says Glueck. “Amazon should consider Lowe’s; Walmart should look to Ulta Beauty.”

Among the analysis of each brand’s needs according to Foursquare:

  • Amazon prefers brands that foster an even deeper relationship with its current shopping base, and investing in challenger brands that are smaller and more upscale than in-market competitors
  • Walmart is playing catch-up in e-commerce, and so is looking to broaden its consumer reach and digital footprint, and develop delivery efficiencies.
  • Both companies are interested in attacking verticals that have proved resistant to e-commerce penetration.
  • Both companies want to refine and experiment with a “showrooming” strategy. They are also both interested in the same consumer: high-net-worth GenX and Millennials.
Source: Foursquare

Target Number 1: Nordstrom

If Amazon and Walmart aren’t fighting over Nordstrom by now, perhaps they should, Glueck says.

Amazon, in particular, needs to connect with the “right shoppers” in the physical world. And considering Amazon’s instant-pickup is initially limited to the 22 locations it began opening in 2015, it needs to expand its placement to actual stores beyond its Whole Foods connection.

“Amazon’s latest acquisition, Whole Foods, and Nordstrom have an overlapping customer set: Foursquare’s data shows that Nordstrom shoppers are almost 2X more likely to shop at Whole Foods than the average consumer,” Glueck says. “So an Amazon-owned Nordstrom chain would deepen Amazon’s relationships with its expanding core base.”

For Walmart, acquisitions are intended to bring in new customers. Nordstrom and its discount subsidiary Nordstrom Rack would likely broaden Walmart’s base to more upper middle income shoppers.

“[Nordstrom] consumers aren’t frequent Walmart-goers,” Glueck says, citing Foursquare’s foot traffic data showing they are about 55 percent less likely to go to Walmart than the average American.

“What Nordstrom does have is a bona-fide track record as well as a healthy concentration of Millennials and females, a nice addition for Walmart to balance out the the purchase of Bonobos, which has a wider male reach,” he says. “Walmart has to pursue familiar verticals that have deep online footholds. And Nordstrom has seen tremendous success versus comparable retailers in developing its e-commerce presence.”

As for Nordstrom Rack, it tends to rank number two in store visits and sales after the discount category leader T.J. Maxx.

“We found that Nordstrom Rack has actually lost more than 2 percent of its visit share to competitive discount retailers in the last two years. Amazon’s ability to slash prices further could lift the competitor brand, and give Amazon a strong foothold into the brick-and-mortar discount market. Imagine if everyday was Amazon Prime day at Nordstrom Rack…”

Source: Foursquare

All Eyes On Warby Parker

Showrooming — the act of comparing prices and products on e-commerce site at the same time one is browsing in a physical store — is the scourge of all brick-and-mortar retailers. And that’s largely thanks to Amazon’s all-encompassing inventory.

Since Warby Parker started its eyeglass sales as an e-commerce platform, it has used its online-only origins to help develop a strategy to combat showrooming at its 46 boutiques. Plus, Warby Parker is currently planning to open 25 more shops, a clear indication that its clicks-to-bricks program is working.

An Amazon purchase could further enhance Warby Parker’s distribution, while reducing its shipping costs.

Plus, consider Warby Parker’s strength with Millennials — over half its shoppers (55 percent) are in that age demographic, which over-indexes at luxury brands including Bloomingdales, Williams Sonoma and Lululemon according to Foursquare data.

Moreover, Warby Parker has similar shopper profiles and significant customer overlap with Whole Foods, as Foursquare data shows that 80 percent of Warby Parker customers also shop at Whole Foods.

Walmart certainly desires those Millennials and by acquiring Warby Parker, it would continue to trajectory its been on with the purchases of Bonobos and Jet.com — two very different offerings from Walmart’s typical shoppers.

“Though we’d expect Walmart to keep Warby as a stand-alone brand, if Walmart ever needed an infusion of new shoppers and/or Millennials into its stores, one way to do so—and quickly—would be to add Warby Parker services and eyeglasses into Walmart’s existing vision centers,” Glueck says. “In addition to being more than half Millennial, Warby Parker customers are 80 percent less likely to visit a Walmart versus the average American—so they’d be fresh eyes on Walmart’s existing inventory.”

 

About The Author
David Kaplan David Kaplan @davidakaplan

A New York City-based journalist for over 20 years, David Kaplan is managing editor of GeoMarketing.com. A former editor and reporter at AdExchanger, paidContent, Adweek and MediaPost.