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Pitney Bowes Opens Up Geospatial Analytics For Immediate Online Purchase

"The new purchase capability opens up the door for us in regard to new business opportunities and revenue streams," says Pitney Bowes Dan Adams. "With the self-serve aspect, we are opening up the ability of small and medium businesses and project-specific use cases, to find and get the high-quality, curated data they need."

A year after partnering with Google to deepen its data services to SMBs, Pitney Bowes is now offering access to its geospatial technology for instant download as a way to increase its ties to a variety of business services clients.

Pitney Bowes has certainly broadened its position from its century-old beginnings as a business-to-business maker of “hand-cranked postage-stamping machines” with its current identity as a global technology and software company focused on business data and provides commerce solutions in the areas of e-commerce, shipping, mailing, and data.

As it has added self-service solutions through the launch of its Software and Data Marketplace over the past year, Pitney Bowes is now offering licenses to over 1,500 geography-specific data sets for purchase online.

“The purchase capability follows the initial launch of the Software and Data Marketplace, which focused on providing users self-serve download access to their licensed product, and getting users comfortable with all of the datasets PB offers,” Dan Adams, VP of Data at Pitney Bowes, told GeoMarketing. “Since its launch, the Marketplace has allowed users to download the products we offer, to sample data, and to visualize the data with on-line mapping capabilities.”

Datasets now available for purchase include Addressing, World Streets, World Boundaries, World Points of Interest, Property Attributes, World Demographics, and GeoEnrichment. Users can customize their purchase preferences with the ability to select data for specific regions, identify preferred file formats and select the license service terms that best meet their organizational needs.

Citing a study Pitney Bowes conducted with Forrester last year, Adams notes that the company found that 99 percent of businesses have trouble using customer data; 69 percent have trouble detecting changes in data; 92 percent stated the need to increase use of third-party data due to the rise of digital technologies and interactions; and 99 percent say they would make a data purchase online.

“The goal with this iteration of the SDM is to remove these complexities of finding and licensing data for our users and to allow them to license and download data whenever and however they want, and to update that data automatically as those updates are made available,” Adams says.

“In our next phase of the Marketplace, we will incorporate our EngageOne Converse technology, which we also launched in Q2 of this year,” Adams adds. “Converse is a chatbot capability that can be used to help our data users identify the right data to meet their business needs, and to point those users to helpful resources available within the Marketplace.”

Asked if online availability opens up the possibility of other categories of business, Adams answers in the affirmative.

“The new purchase capability opens up the door for us in regard to new business opportunities and revenue streams,” he says. “With the self-serve aspect, we are opening up the ability of small and medium businesses and project-specific use cases, to find and get the high-quality, curated data they need. This greatly expands the user base for our data products and opens up the “long-tail” of the data market for PB.

“With the Marketplace, we bring high-quality location and business intelligence data to all users, regardless of environment, in a one-stop-shop, self-serve marketplace,” Adams continued. “Our data is platform-agnostic, so regardless of your infrastructure, our data can be seamlessly integrated, making us a compelling data provider for every business.”

About The Author
David Kaplan David Kaplan @davidakaplan

A New York City-based journalist for over 20 years, David Kaplan is managing editor of GeoMarketing.com. A former editor and reporter at AdExchanger, paidContent, Adweek and MediaPost.