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DMEXCO Takeaway: Marketers Are ‘Laser-Focused’ On Location Services

At DMEXCO, marketers are discussing how to make location-based services, like Pokémon Go, work even harder for advertisers and brands, says GetResponse's Daniel Brzezinski.

Determining how to extract the marketing value out of the Internet of Things, augmented reality/virtual reality, and the evolving advertising landscape in general continued to be the big topics at this year’s DMEXCO conference. And at the center of most of those discussions: figuring out location technology can buttress efforts to shape consumers along the path-to-purchase.

“From traditional channels like email, to more bleeding-edge platforms like AR and VR, location data powers insights on how to best engage customers in a more personalized way,” noted Daniel Brzezinski, CMO and VP of Marketing & Product Development at SMB marketing platform GetResponse. “At DMEXCO, marketers are discussing how to make location-based services, like Pokémon Go, work even harder for advertisers and brands.”

GeoMarketing: How did location technology fit into the discussions at DMEXCO this year?

Daniel Brzezinski: Even with Pokémon Go’s recent fade, its popularity — 55 million users in its first month out – makes one thing very clear: location-based services are still the key to understanding customer context. From traditional channels like email to more bleeding-edge platforms like AR and VR, location data powers insights on how to best engage customers in a more personalized way. At DMEXCO, marketers are laser-focused on how to make location-based services, like Pokémon Go, work even harder for advertisers and brands.

For technology vendors, that has to play out in the platforms and products we bring to the market. Using GetResponse as an example, given its growing value to marketers, we’ve extended our email offering’s geo-location capabilities in several unique ways, just over the last year alone.

In 2015, we introduced Global View – a feature that allows you to see, in real-time, not only who opens, shares and likes your content, but where that occurs. Our users have shown us that they’ve needed even more, so a few months ago, we launched a marketing automation module that lets them create highly targeted, location-based campaigns with subscribers all over the world.

Is the fading of Pokémon Go’s popularity likely to diminish any discussion of gaming and location?

We’ve heard a lot of people talking about Pokémon Go, despite the fade. But the lessons learned and potential teased around hyper local, location-based marketing, whether it’s in the context of mobile gaming or AR, more specifically, are what will continue to be hot buttons.

This is especially true among SMB marketers – think local restaurants and retailers, for example – who benefited from Pokémon Go more than large brands did, frankly. The value they saw through the game and continue to see will keep the discussion going around other methods, technologies and platforms, powered by location, that could also effectively drive online-to-offline uplift. DMEXCO was fertile ground for these conversations.

How meaningful is AR and VR, with location as an aspect, for advertisers this year?

Because our brains are hardwired to remember events linked to locations, the popularity of AR and VR in advertising is growing. Take 360-degree VR for example. The technological novelty and intensity of the experience makes it a great opportunity for an effective marketing campaign, but still, you need to create a great story first. It may seem tough, at first, to convince users to try out the new technologies, but as we’ve seen with Pokémon Go, certain customer segments are particularly keen and quick to adapt.

In terms of location tech, which is likely to be more meaningful this year: “outdoor” services like geotargeting or “indoor” proximity services like beacons and sensors?

I don’t think we can say one will be more meaningful than the other – or frame them as conflicting with each other. Both outdoor (geofencing) and indoor (beacons) marketing technologies go hand in hand and are ultimately complimentary. Or at least they should be, if used effectively.

What questions should marketers be asking location tech providers in terms of evaluating how actionable these tools are?

At the end of the day – the technology is only a supportive piece of a marketing program. It’s just a tool you want to use to connect with your audience. With that in mind, for most marketers, I would recommend asking first: “How can you help me tell my story?” That’s the key to understanding how you can be supported and to discern which services provide actionable and relevant capabilities.

About The Author
David Kaplan David Kaplan @davidakaplan

A New York City-based journalist for over 20 years, David Kaplan is managing editor of GeoMarketing.com. A former editor and reporter at AdExchanger, paidContent, Adweek and MediaPost.